How does having multiple employers during a tax year affect your tax return?

During the 2020 tax filing season we handled an increasing number of tax returns where individuals had multiple employers. Closures of businesses were an issue Canada wide. Reduced operating hours became common place, and forced many to take up multiple employments in order to maintain the income levels to which they were accustomed.  We imagine the case will be the same for the upcoming 2021 tax filing season, but how exactly can multiple employments during the tax year affect your tax return?

Have your employers been taxing you correctly?

Some employers, especially smaller or new businesses are not always the most organized when it comes to managing their payroll and tax deductions from their employees pay. This can cause problems when it comes to tax filing at year end, as we often see T4s where the employer has made quite substantial errors over many pay periods where the individual had been taxed incorrectly. We have seen cases where individuals have earned over $15,000 without having a cent of income tax deducted from their pay.  These types of payroll deduction errors can result in large tax balances owing to CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) at year end, which often comes as a surprise to the individual filing their tax return.

When an individual has more than one employer, the additional employers should be deducting tax at a higher rate than the first employer, to take into consideration the pay that has already been earned for the year to date from that first employer. If multiple additional employers are all taxing pay at a lower rate than required this will most likely result in a tax balance owing to CRA at year end.

What happens if you have a tax balance owing? 

It is not great news to find out that you owe money to CRA at year end (especially with the increasing accommodation rental rates in Vancouver and other Canadian cities), however it is not the end of the world! It is actually quite common for an individual to have a tax balance owing, and as long as your tax return is filed before the deadline and the tax balance paid to CRA on time, you will not be penalized. This is why it is important to submit your taxes to CRA on time, to avoid penalties on tax balances owed to CRA. 

How can you ensure that you do not have a tax balance owing at year end?

When you start working for an additional employer during the tax year you should inform them of your current employment status. By informing your employer of your year to date income from another employer, they will be able to tax your pay at the correct rate, this means you will not be undertaxed on your pay and therefore owing tax to CRA at year end. 

You cannot locate your T4 from your previous employer and they are not responding to your requests for a new T4

If you cannot find T4s from all of your employers for the tax year you can either log into your CRA account online to download your T4 slips, or call CRA and request that they mail a copy to you. If you are close to the tax filing deadline and do not have time to receive a copy from CRA or set up your online CRA account, we offer a $30 tax slip download service whereby we can access your tax slips online and download them for you.

Do you have any questions or need assistance with your tax return filing?

If you have any questions regarding your deductions from your pay cheques, issues with your employer correctly deducting your pay or any other tax related queries, please get in touch with the team at team@jackstaxback.com or visit our Vancouver office* and we will be more than happy to assist you. Tax doesn’t have to be taxing!

*At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is not open for visits due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Frequently asked tax questions, and common tax misconceptions

We often receive the same tax related questions from clients and often advise on the same common tax misconceptions. Here are a few of the most reoccurring examples

I did not earn money in Canada during the tax year so do not need to file a return?

Technically speaking if you are a Canadian tax resident and did not have any income during the tax year from any source around the world, then you are not required to file a tax return. However, it is very probable if you fail to file a return for a tax year that CRA will be in contact in the future requesting you to file that return. If CRA request that you file a tax return, you will be required to file the tax return. 

Even if you did not have any income within Canada during the tax year you may be entitled to a small tax refund when filing. British Columbia Residents are issued with a $75 tax credit even if they have zero income to declare, to it does pay to file your return.

What are the dates of the tax year in Canada?

We file tax returns for quite a lot of temporary foreign workers, many of whom come from countries which have varying tax year dates. In Canada the tax year run from January 1 – December 31 which is quite easy to remember!

I missed the tax deadline, is it too late to file my taxes?

It appears there must be some ‘fake news’ online among Vancouver facebook groups which has led a lot of individuals to believe that if they miss the April 30 deadline to file taxes they must wait until the next tax year to file their taxes. Fortunately, this is not true! If you are late to filing your tax return and miss the April 30 deadline you can still file your tax return. It is also advised that you do file your tax return as soon as possible, if for some reason you owe money to CRA the sooner you settle the tax balance owing with CRA the less interest that will be added to that tax balance owing.

I have multiple tax years that need filing, can I file it all on one tax return?

Unfortunately, this is not possible Canada, we cannot speak for other countries. Although if enough people suggest this option to CRA maybe it could become a reality. For those who have multiple years which need filing it can often be a pain tracking down all the income and expense information from many years ago. As painful as tax filing can be, it is advised to file your taxes as soon as possible.

I arrived in Canada towards the end of the year so need to file a tax return as a non-resident?

We receive a lot of questions from first time tax filers who are new to Canada and are unsure of their tax residency. One misconception is that if you have arrived in Canada towards the end of the tax year, and resided in Canada for less than 6 months by the end of the tax year that you must be filed as a ‘non-resident’. For the most part, this is untrue. If you arrived in December, and are planning on residing in Canada for longer than 6 months you would file your tax return as a newcomer tax resident even though you would have only been residing in Canada for a month by the end of the tax year.

Do you have any tax related questions or concerns?

If you have any questions, queries or have been provided with some tax advice that does not seem correct, please do not hesitate to get in contact with the team at team@jackstaxback.com or visit our Vancouver office* and we can help you navigate the complicated world of tax. Tax doesn’t have to be taxing!

*At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is not open for visits due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Have you worked from home during 2021 and received a T2200 from your employer?

If you have worked from home during 2021 and been issued a T2200 from your employer, you may be in luck, it could increase your 2021 tax refund quite substantially!

What is a T2200? 

A T2200 is a form that Canadian employers fill out which allows you to claim employment related expenses on your tax return. The most common reason an employer would fill out a T2200 is because an employee has been required to carry out their employment duties from a home office. Employers are not obliged to fill out a T2200, so if you have worked from home and have not received a T2200 it may be worth asking your employer’s payroll department to fill one out for you. 

What does a T2200 mean for your 2021 tax return?

If you have received a T2200 on which your employer has stated that you were required to work from a home office you will be able to claim the following expenses on your tax return:

  • Electricity
  • Heat
  • Water
  • Home internet access fees
  • Minor home repair and maintenance costs
  • Rent paid for your home
  • Home insurance (Commission employees only)
  • Property taxes (Commission employees only)
  • Office supplies (Pens, paper, ink cartridges, general stationary)

How does this improve your 2021 tax refund amount?

When you claim expenses on your tax return, they reduce your taxable income, thereby reducing the amount of tax owed on your income, which will either improve your entitled refund amount or reduce a balance owing to CRA (Canada Revenue Agency).

How do you claim the expenses on your tax return?

You will be required to declare all eligible expenses incurred during the 2021 tax year. You will also need to declare the percentage of your home which makes up your home office. If you incurred $10,000 in home office expenses, and used 10% of your home as your office, this will provide you with a $10,000 x 10% = $1,000 home office deduction on your tax return. 

What will be better for my tax refund? The simplified flat rate method or the detailed method?

You can see from the above example how it is possible to be entitled to a $1,000 deduction on your tax return, this is higher than the maximum $500 deduction claim when using the simplified deduction method. For those who worked from home for the full 12 months of 2021 it is quite easy to incur over $10,000 in apartment rental costs alone (especially in Vancouver and other large Canadian cities), so those who are renting are usually entitled to a larger deduction when using the T2200 detailed claim method, than the simplified method. 

Do you have any questions about your 2021 tax return?

If you have any tax related questions at all, please do not hesitate to contact the team at team@jackstaxback.com or visit our Vancouver office*. We will be happy to assist you become more knowledgeable about your deduction eligibility and to claim the detailed home office deduction through a T2200 on your 2021 tax return if you wish to use our services. We will also be able to advise on any other deductions or tax credits that may be applicable to your tax situation. Tax doesn’t have to be taxing!

*At the time of this posting our Vancouver office is not open for visits due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Have you worked from a home office during the 2021 tax year? CRA have updated the home office deduction (flat rate method) for the 2021 tax year

As many of you are aware, in 2020 CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) introduced a new simple way for individuals to claim working from home expenses due to the large numbers of tax payers who were required to work from home due to COVID-19. It is important to note that there have been positive changes made to this simplified working from home expense claim that are being implemented on your 2021 Canadian tax return.

What has changed on your 2021 tax return?

Last year (2020 tax returns) the simplified flat rate deduction was calculated as $2 per day worked from home, up to a maximum deduction claim of $400. This year CRA have announced that this is increasing to a $500 maximum deduction claim! Woohoo.

Who is eligible?

To be eligible to take advantage of the home office expense claim on your 2021 tax return you must meet all of the following criteria:

  • You must have worked from home (in Canada) in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • You must have worked from home for more than 50% of the time from home for a period of at least 4 consecutive weeks during 2021
  • You must only be claiming home office expenses, and are not claiming any other employment expenses on line 22900 of your 2021 tax return
  • Your employer must not have reimbursed you for all of your home office expenses incurred during 2021

How do you claim the home office deduction on your tax return?

To make this claim on your 2021 tax return you will need to declare the number of days that you worked from home in your home office

What does this deduction do for your tax return calculations?

We had a lot of clients who were caught out on the definition of a ‘deduction’ on their 2020 tax return. Unfortunately, the $500 deduction will not improve your 2021 tax refund by $500, this deduction simply means that you will no longer be required to pay tax on $500 of your 2021 income. For individuals in a higher tax bracket the deduction will offer higher tax savings than those in a lower tax bracket. 

Do you have any questions about your 2021 tax return?

If you have any tax related questions at all, please feel free to reach out to the team at team@jackstaxback.com or stop by our Vancouver office*. We will be more than happy to assist you become more knowledgeable about your deduction eligibility and to claim the home office deduction on your 2021 tax return if you wish to use our services. We will also be able to advise on any other deductions or tax credits that may be applicable to your tax situation. Tax doesn’t have to be taxing!

*At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is not accepting in person meetings due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Should you file a tax return even if you had no Canadian income during the tax year?

We file tax returns regularly for temporary foreign workers and international students who are new to Canada within the tax year. There is often confusion surrounding newcomers’ obligations to file a tax return if they arrived at the end of the tax year, but did not actually take up employment or have any income before the end of the tax year. 

What are your tax obligations?

If you arrived in Canada and did not take up employment or generate any income while residing in Canada, then you technically are not required to file a tax return unless you receive a letter from CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) demanding that you file a tax return. 

What are the financial benefits to filing a Canadian tax return even if you had zero Canadian income?

There are certainly financial benefits to filing a Canadian tax return if you were residing in Canada but did not earn any income. If you are a newcomer tax resident you will often receive a tax refund when filing a tax return even if you did not have any income. In British Columbia tax residents can receive a $75 tax credit (refund) if they file a tax return without even reporting any income. 

What are the logistical benefits to filing a Canadian tax return even if you had zero Canadian income?

When becoming a tax resident in Canada you are required to report your date of arrival on your first tax return that is filed with CRA. If you arrive in Canada at the end of the tax year, but do not file a tax return because you did not have any income, this can create processing errors by CRA when a tax return is subsequently filed the following year without the recording of a date of entry. This type of error results in CRA changing individuals’ status to ‘non-resident’ as they have no record of a date of entry. It can be quite problematic correcting ‘non-resident’ tax status with CRA, who are notoriously slow at implementing changes.

Benefits of filing for students

International students who are new to Canada that did not have earnings can benefit from filing a tax return. In order to record tuition credits with CRA a tax return must be filed for the period in which the tuition credits are earned, even if there was no income during that period. To benefit from your tuition credit which can be carried over into subsequent tax years it is certainly beneficial to file a tax return. 

Application for GST/HST credit

Individuals who have earnings under a certain threshold are entitled to receive a quarterly (4 times a year) cheque from the Government. In order for the government to assess individual’s entitlement to receive this benefit, a tax return must be filed with CRA. If you are a newcomer to Canada and wish to apply to receive this benefit in the next tax year you must file a tax return in order to apply. Waiting 12 months to file a tax return can result in individuals missing out on over $500 in benefit payments.

Questions and assistance with tax filing

If you have any questions about the benefits of filing a tax return even if you did not have any Canadian income, please do not hesitate to contact us at team@jackstaxback.com or comes visit us at our Vancouver based office*. We will be more than happy to assist you with your queries and the processing of your tax return. 

*At the date of publishing our Vancouver office is not open for visits due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Are you looking to file your Canadian tax return but can’t find/have misplaced your tax documents?

For many individuals who are new to Canada on a working holiday visa it is very common to take on multiple casual jobs, as well as having multiple addresses within the tax year. As such many lose or do not receive T4 documents from old employers. Does this sound like you? Fear not, we have commenced a new online tax slip service whereby for a $30 fee we will be able to download copies of your tax slips from the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) website and provide them to you.

Why is it important to file your tax return including all tax slips from the year?

When filing your tax return, you are submitting a declaration to CRA of your income for the tax year. If you fail to include T4 information from all employers from the tax year it could be deemed as a failure to declare income by CRA. Usually, CRA will give a pass to first time offenders, however if you fail to declare all income on multiple tax returns then CRA will impose penalties. It is best advised to stay on CRA’s good side as they can are more likely to forgive small penalties and interest amounts if you are in their good books.

How do we download your tax slips?

If you need our services to download all tax slips for the tax slip, we can provide you with an authorization form. Once we have received a signed copy of the authorization form, we will submit a copy to CRA. This will then allow us to log into your online CRA account and download the tax slips. If you would prefer to only allow limited access to your online CRA account you can limit the access to a certain time period.

Set up a MyCRA account to download the tax slips yourself!

You can skip this service entirely by setting up your online CRA account yourself! If you would rather save $30 you can contact CRA and set up your CRA online account, where you will have access to tax slips for all years in which you have worked in Canada. Please note, CRA does not allow individuals who are filing taxes for the first time to set up an online CRA account, this can create a bit of a catch 22 for those who are unable to get a copy of all of their tax slips and are also unable to access their online CRA account. 

Does this tax slip download service sound like a good option for you?

If you wish to pursue this tax slip download service, please do not hesitate to contact us at team@jackstaxback.com or visit our Vancouver office* and let us know how we can be of assistance. We will then forward an authorization form to you which will provide us with the permission required to download your tax slips, simple!

**At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is unavailable for in person meetings due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Are you filing taxes for the first time after becoming a rideshare driver?

Many individuals have taken advantage of the surging popularity of ridesharing as a form of transport within Vancouver and other big cities around Canada, as such there have been a large increase in the number of individuals acting as rideshare drivers. A lot of income will have ben generated from rideshare services performed over the tax year, and this type of income requires income and expense declarations which can be more tricky to report to CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) than income earned through a company’s payroll.

How does rideshare income affect your tax return?

Although income is being earned via a rideshare provider, the income is technically employment income and therefore it is not run through a payroll system where tax is deducted at source. As someone who earns rideshare income you are technically operating as a contractor, this means you are required to declare your contractor income earned during the tax year to CRA, and you will then owe tax on that income to CRA when filing your taxes at year end. 

This may sound intimidating knowing that you will owe tax on that rideshare income earned, however you can reduce your taxes owed to CRA by claiming expenses against your rideshare income

How does claiming expenses impact your tax return, and what expenses can you claim on your tax return?

As an example. If you earn $10,000 in rideshare income and claim zero expenses, you will owe tax on the full $10,000 amount. If you earn $10,000 but are able to claim $4,000 in expenses you will only owe tax on $10,000 – $4,000 = $6,000. It is clearly beneficial to claim expenses against your rideshare income to reduce the amount of tax owed to CRA at year end. 

To claim expenses on your tax return, they must be allowable by CRA. As a rule of thumb, any reasonable cost that was incurred in order to specifically earn your contractor income should be allowable. For example. Buying gas to allow you to operate your rideshare vehicle is allowable as without it you would not be able to operate the vehicle and generate income. However, buying Vancouver Canucks tickets would not be allowable as the tickets are not required in order to generate income from ridesharing. 

Common examples or expenses to be claimed on your tax return related to ridesharing would be gas, insurance, repairs and maintenance of vehicle, cell phone service, vehicle lease costs, NOT Vancouver Canucks tickets

Keeping track of expenses and receipts

When filing taxes at year end it is important to keep track of expenses as well as the receipts related to those expenses. Being organized and tracking our expenses will allow you to file your taxes more easily and ensure that the correct information is being reported to CRA. CRA can request copies of receipts up to 6 years after the tax year has been filed, therefore it is important to make sure you have correctly/safely stored your receipts. One good method to ensure the safety of your records is to scan copies of your receipts and store them on your computer or a hard drive. 

Importance of correctly reporting information to CRA (Canada Revenue Agency)

When submitting income and expense information to CRA on your tax return it is important to ensure the information is accurate. If CRA audit you and ask for proof of the totals of expenses being claimed on your tax return, you will need to be able to submit that proof to them. If CRA deem that you have not been truthful with the information submitted to them it can result in penalties being issued.

Questions and assistance with filing your tax return

Filing taxes as a contractor can be quite tricky as there are a lot more expenses available to contractors. If you have any questions regarding your tax return or are looking for assistance with your contractor tax filing, please contact us at team@jackstaxback.com or visit our Vancouver office*, and we will be more than happy to assist. Tax doesn’t have to be taxing!

*At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is not open for visits due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Important things to remember for your 2021 Canadian tax return

Here are a few important items that may be relevant to you for the upcoming 2021 tax filing.

Did you receive COVID or other benefits during the 2021 tax year?

2021 saw many individuals continuing to lose employment due to COVID all across Canada, as such many received COVID related benefits throughout the year. It is important to remember that these COVID related benefit payments are considered as income which must be declared on your 2021 tax return. The benefit related income will be reported on either a T4A or a T4E and must be included when submitting your tax return to CRA (Canada revenue agency). 

Were you required to work from home during the 2021 tax year?

As with 2020, there have been a lot of workers who have been forced to carry out their role from home offices. CRA has announced that it will continue to allow the simplified working from home deduction for the 2021 tax year. Good news, the deduction has increased to a maximum of $500 which is a $100 increase from the maximum allowed on the 2020 tax return. If you were required to work from home (in Canada) for longer than 4 weeks continuously then you will be able to make the simplified working from home deduction claim on your 2021 tax return. 

Did you arrive in Canada during the 2021 tax year?

Vancouver, Toronto and other cities around Canada are very popular for temporary foreign workers. If you are a newcomer tax resident to Canada it may be daunting filing your first tax return. Here are a few important things to consider when filing your 2021 tax return:

  • Record your date of entry to Canada to ensure your tax credits are correctly calculated
  • Receive T4s from all 2021 employers in Canada and report all income on your tax return
  • Tax filing deadline is April 30 (After this date CRA may impose late filing fees depending on your tax situation)
  • Make sure you file using an address to which you have access to the mail as sensitive personal information will be mailed to that address by CRA
  • Set up direct deposit refunds at the time of filing your tax return, this means you will never have to worry about cheques being lost in the mail

Did you emigrate from Canada during the 2021 tax year?

If you emigrated from Canada during 2021 here are a few important things to keep in mind:

  • You must file a tax return for the final tax year in which you earned Canadian income
  • An emigrant tax return cannot be filed online, it must be submitted to CRA via mail
  • CRA will mail refund cheques to foreign addresses
  • If you continue to receive GST/HST credits after the date you left Canada, it is most probable that CRA will request that these payments be returned to them.

(Ontario/Manitoba residents only) Did you make accommodation rental payments or pay property tax during 2021?

If you resided in Ontario or Manitoba during 2021 and paid rent or property tax on your accommodation, do not forget to apply for the credit on your 2021 tax return. The application for the credit is submitted as part of your tax return. 

Questions and tax filing services

If you have any questions about the items noted above, about tax in general, or would like assistance with your 2021 tax return filing, please do not hesitate to contact us via email – team@jackstaxback.com or stop by our Vancouver office located in the Vancouver West End**. Our team will be more than happy to assist you, tax doesn’t have to be taxing. 

**At the time of publishing our Vancouver office is not accepting in person meetings due to COVID-19. Please reach our team via email – team@jackstaxback.com 

Covid Relief Update – Interest relief 2020 Tax Returns

CRA has announced new COVID relief measures for individuals filing their 2020 tax returns. As part of their scheme to reduce the financial burden on individuals who need it most, CRA has announced interest relief for those who meet the eligibility criteria.

A lot of individuals who received CERB/CRB or other COVID-19 relief payments will unfortunately owe taxes to CRA when filing their 2020 tax returns. Because CERB payments are considered as taxable income, and had zero income tax deducted at source, it means that most will owe tax balances on those payments received.

What are the criteria to qualify for interest relief on tax balances owing?

  • You must have a 2020 balance owing to CRA
  • Your 2020 total income must be $75,000 or below
  • You must have received a COVID-19 benefit payment (CERB, CESB, CRB, CRCB, CRSB) during 2020
  • You must have filed your 2020 tax return

The majority of tax payers who received a COVID-19 benefit will meet the above criteria.

What does the interest relief mean?

If you have a tax balance owing to CRA from your 2020 tax return and meet the above criteria, you will not be charged interest on that balance owing until after April 30, 2022. This provides individuals with tax balances owing an additional 12 months to settle their tax balance owing with CRA. 

Late filing penalties

Please note, there is still the 5% late filing penalty for those with tax balances owing who fail to file their 2020 tax return before the end of April 30, 2021. This penalty means all individuals who file their taxes late, and have a tax balance owing will be hit with an additional 5% on top of their balance owing. An additional 1% penalty is added for each month the tax return is filed late, up to a maximum of 12 months (12%).

Need more information? Drop us a line and we’ll be happy to assist any queries.

Why you may have a balance owing to CRA

Why you may have a balance owing to CRA

For some of us, there can be an unwanted surprise when starting to file your most recent tax return. The dreaded balance owing. For many, a tax balance owing will come as a complete shock, as most employed individuals will be expecting a tax refund, as opposed to a tax balance owing. 

Why would someone who is paid through payroll owe taxes at year end?

The simplest explanation for why an individual may owe additional taxes to CRA is because their employer(s) failed to deduct sufficient tax from their pay cheques throughout the tax year. When filing a tax return, the total income is compared to the total taxes deducted, and a tax overpayment (refund) or tax underpayment (balance owing) can be assessed. There are several, common explanations for most balances owing.

Multiple employers

Probably the most common scenario where employed individuals have a tax balance owing is because they had multiple employers during the tax year. If you are taking on multiple jobs during the tax year it is important to inform each HR department that you currently have multiple employers. Each year individuals are allowed a tax free threshold of income. Your employer will recognize the tax free threshold when calculating your tax deductions. When calculating your tax deductions, a second employer needs to know that your original employer has already accounted for your tax free threshold. If you have multiple employers who all include a tax free threshold in their tax deduction calculations, you will have a balance owing to CRA. 

Receiving a raise during the tax year

If you receive a raise during the year, it can unfortunately turn the happiness of receiving a raise into the sadness of a tax balance owing to CRA. Some employers will fail to sufficiently increase tax deductions on the increased amount of income, resulting in a tax balance owing.

Simple payroll system error

Some smaller employers will process payroll ‘in house’. Unfortunately, inexperienced employers who are unsure of the ever-changing tax deduction rates can frequently fail to correctly deduct tax from their employees pay cheques, leaving their employees surprised with a tax balance owing when they file their taxes.

CERB/CRB/EI payments

The CERB and CRB payments which were introduced in 2020 as COVID relief measures are considered as taxable income. Where EI payments usually have some tax deducted at source, the Canadian Government decided that they would not deduct tax from the CERB and CRB payments. This means that individuals who received the COVID relief payments during 2020 will be required to pay tax on the payments received. 

Withdrawing RRSP funds (not for home buying purposes as part of the HBP)

If you withdraw funds from an RRSP account, depending on the circumstances the financial institution from whom you have withdrawn the RRSP funds will deduct tax from the withdrawal amount. However, it is rare for the financial institution to deduct sufficient tax from the withdrawal, this will result in tax being owed when filing your tax return.

Additional income on top of employment income

If you are fortunate enough to have income sources on top of your regular employment income, it is very possible that you will owe tax on that income. Most individuals who receive self-employed income will already be prepared to pay tax in that income, however those who receive interest income on a T5 may be blindsided by that tax owed on this additional income. 

If you are concerned about your tax situation, and are unsure whether you will owe additional tax when filing your tax return, why not ask a professional for assistance

At Jackstaxback we are always happy to offer assistance to those filing returns under more complicated circumstances, including when individuals have a balance owing to CRA. We will try to explain the effects of income and deductions on your tax refund or balance owing at year end, and try to provide ass much insight as possible. Feel free to contact us today for a tax return quote.